How do you handle communication with different clients?

miriam739

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Oct 4, 2017
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#1
Hi everyone!

I'm new to the world of freelancing and I have a couple of questions that I'm hoping that you can help me with! I wonder how you're handling communication with different clients especially when some clients require you to use certain channels/collaboration tools, and others need you to be on different channels? Is this an issue I should be concerned about? I would love to hear your thoughts on this and how you're going about it!
 

wahmbrenda

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Oct 27, 2017
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#2
I've found that the majority of my clients prefer email. Of course, if you're using different freelance networks (e.g. Upwork) you'll need to communicate with them there. I think it's a matter of keeping good records. This is something that any business needs though and this is your business so make sure you keep good records. (I hope this is what you were asking LOL)
 

evrimaslan85

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#4
I've found that the majority of my clients prefer email. Of course, if you're using different freelance networks (e.g. Upwork) you'll need to communicate with them there. I think it's a matter of keeping good records. This is something that any business needs though and this is your business so make sure you keep good records. (I hope this is what you were asking LOL)
I totally agree.
 

revel

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Dec 21, 2017
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#5
Palmer_Method_sample.jpg
foto credits

Hey all.

Cooperative platforms and emails aside....

I'm old-school in my communication with clients. This means that I always address the client with a:

Dear Client (substituting "client" for a name)

Followed by some agreeable words related to the last time we communicated,

Thank you for your kind words. Your comments on xxx were especially helpful.

Followed by a quick intro to the theme in question:

As to your questions about xxx, I think that ....

And, ending with a pleasant goodbye:

Thanks again for your comments. I hope this is satisfactory and look forward to hearing back from you soon.

Closing the letter with a:

Regards / Cheers / Kind regards

That is, I do not fall into current trends of being chatty or Twittery or FaceBooky in communicating with clients. Without exception, I receive like communication from them. This format with the formal courtesy maintains a professional distance and makes communicating fluid and constructive. Even difficult themes, such as payments or frictions arising from style questions or deadlines are easier to deal with when you've established that your communication will always be formal and polite.

Doesn't matter if you are using email exclusively or a cooperative platform, always greet, write in complete sentences without annoying SMS abbreviations (lol and lmao are not allowed!), punctuate correctly and proofread before sending, close out with a pleasant goodbye and you'll have no problems with clients on a communication level.

Adjust the above to each client, but keep it distant and formal.

peace,
revel.
 

debng

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Dec 19, 2017
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#6
Most of my clients use email, though I also communicate via Skype, Slack, and text. It's usually the clients choice.As long as we have good communication, I don't mind having several different platforms. What I don't like are clients who ignore emails, phone calls, skypes, etc., or who are very vague when they communicate.
 

zachbuckler

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#7
I use the chat feature of Google Hangouts with one of my clients. You can chat in real time. Or if they are not there, you can leave a chat message for them to view at their convenience.