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Get a Real Job

Discussion in 'Freelance Community Chat' started by Chris_A, Apr 8, 2017.

  1. Chris_A

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    How do you guys deal with people telling you that freelancing is not a real job and that you should get hired at a company instead, working a day job? Can you even convince people that don`t consider freelancing real work?
     
  2. chundley

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    Since I still work full-time, I don't know have any experience handling the first question, though it may be worth it to refer to yourself as a small business owner. I think over time, as more people struggle with an uneven recovery, as it becomes ever harder for an organized labor resurgence, and more folks identified in the Generation Z cohort become freelancers, it will get easier over time.
     
  3. witchwriter

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    I have worked a lot of corporate jobs. What people ask me the most is how to do what I do. I don't have to spend money on clothes or transportation for work. I don't have to deal with a lot of obnoxious people. I don't get my productivity sucked into someone else's results. People who work corporate jobs need the perks and the status. But these jobs can waste years of your life. People hiring in corporate america want the skills freelancers have. But if you have these skills why spend all day playing office politics?
     
  4. chundley

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    I think a significant portion of the trade-off is the protections you receive in the form of established labor law. While I agree that there are significant benefits to the entrepreneurial mindset, adaptability, flexibility, etc. you obtain as a freelancer, the benefits, besides status and perks (the latter of which are nothing to sneeze at if you have kids), is that you have legal recourse if you get paid a subminimum wage (even if you enter into a contract for it). You have far more legal recourse if you don't get paid on time. You have far more legal recourse against harassment (which you can still be on the receiving end of as a freelancer.) Etcetera.

    Ultimately, I think, as a country we are continuing to chip away at that foundation of established labor laws; I also think corporations are shifting more and more in the direction of a gig economy. I am planning on going full-time when I can afford it, but I think that there's plenty of value in working in office gig, even with the office politics, for many people beyond status.
     
  5. witchwriter

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    chundley u hit the nail in the head. As a freelancer then you need to find entrepreneur hiring managers capable of developing the right relationships. Too bad writers as a whole get lowballed to an awful degree.
     

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